GUIDE: Washout Flooring of the Ford Bronco

David
Jun 23, 2021

Rank VI

Jun 23, 2021

By Laura Zielinski



The washout flooring of the Bronco is high on many customers’ wish lists, especially those who plan on using their vehicle in the dirt and mud. Drain plugs may be a non-negotiable option for some, yet nearly everyone would say they are a “nice to have.”

Washout floors with drain plugs come standard on Black Diamond and Badlands. To stick with the rubberized flooring on Badlands, you’ll need to keep the standard Marine Grade Vinyl (MGV) seating. Choosing leather-trimmed seating means moving to carpeted floors (which are easily protected with available floor liners).

Active vs. Passive Drain Plugs
Even carpeted Broncos have drain plugs. You won’t be hosing out a Bronco optioned that way, but Ford has added in passive drain plugs under the carpet in case water gets in to where it’s not supposed to be. There are six passive plugs in the passenger area of the 4-door models and one in the jack compartment.



These passive plugs carry over to Broncos with the washout floors as well. In addition to the seven passive drain plugs in the 4-doors, there are four active plugs. The reason for the passive drain plugs is to drain water that gets in below the rubberized wash-out liner – for example if you tackle an overly ambitious water crossing.

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Using the Active Plugs
Having MGV seats and washout flooring doesn’t mean you should douse the interior without care. Don’t flood the upholstery, and sponge or wipe down critical components like the dash.


To properly rinse down your Bronco’s floors, use a low-pressure garden hose –– not a power washer. Aim for a flow rate of 10 liters per minute.
  1. Pull out the floor mats, if equipped, to get to the plugs. Rotate the drain plugs counterclockwise to “open.”
  2. A good rule of thumb is to spray each zone for 30 seconds at a time, to prevent flooding. Aim for the highest part of the zone first, such as the sides of the transmission tunnel in the driver or passenger footwell. Rinse the debris toward the drain plug.
  3. Let the water drain for approximately 30 seconds.
  4. Repeat if necessary and move on to the next zone.
  5. Take care of visible puddles with a towel/sponge so you don’t cause mold or corrosion to develop.
  6. Rotate the plugs to “close.”
Jed, Howdy and 16 others

Rank XII

Jun 23, 2021

#1
Thanks @Laura. Since I got base, I get the same # of plugs with carpet as the rubberized flooring...didn't know that....and I prefer to call them Active "Challenged" Plugs...Dummy seems so harsh.
the poacher, Deano Bronc and 2 others

Rank VI

Jun 23, 2021

#2
Thanks @Laura. Since I got base, I get the same # of plugs with carpet as the rubberized flooring...didn't know that....and I prefer to call them Active "Challenged" Plugs...Dummy seems so harsh.
Yes, but just how "challenged" are they?
the poacher, TK1215
OBXBroncoGuy

Jun 23, 2021

#3
Any way you can show us what they look like with carpet and 2d? :cool:
TK1215

Rank VI

Jun 23, 2021

#4
By Laura Zielinski



The washout flooring of the Bronco is high on many customers’ wish lists, especially those who plan on using their vehicle in the dirt and mud. Drain plugs may be a non-negotiable option for some, yet nearly everyone would say they are a “nice to have.”

Washout floors with drain plugs come standard on Black Diamond and Badlands. To stick with the rubberized flooring on Badlands, you’ll need to keep the standard Marine Grade Vinyl (MGV) seating. Choosing leather-trimmed seating means moving to carpeted floors (which are easily protected with available floor liners).

Active vs. Passive Drain Plugs
Even carpeted Broncos have drain plugs. You won’t be hosing out a Bronco optioned that way, but Ford has added in passive drain plugs under the carpet in case water gets in to where it’s not supposed to be. There are six passive plugs in the passenger area of the 4-door models and one in the jack compartment.



These passive plugs carry over to Broncos with the washout floors as well. In addition to the seven passive drain plugs in the 4-doors, there are four active plugs. The reason for the passive drain plugs is to drain water that gets in below the rubberized wash-out liner – for example if you tackle an overly ambitious water crossing.

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3

Using the Active Plugs
Having MGV seats and washout flooring doesn’t mean you should douse the interior without care. Don’t flood the upholstery, and sponge or wipe down critical components like the dash.


To properly rinse down your Bronco’s floors, use a low-pressure garden hose –– not a power washer. Aim for a flow rate of 10 liters per minute.
  1. Pull out the floor mats, if equipped, to get to the plugs. Rotate the drain plugs counterclockwise to “open.”
  2. A good rule of thumb is to spray each zone for 30 seconds at a time, to prevent flooding. Aim for the highest part of the zone first, such as the sides of the transmission tunnel in the driver or passenger footwell. Rinse the debris toward the drain plug.
  3. Let the water drain for approximately 30 seconds.
  4. Repeat if necessary and move on to the next zone.
  5. Take care of visible puddles with a towel/sponge so you don’t cause mold or corrosion to develop.
  6. Rotate the plugs to “close.”
Laura, thank you for not including the typical legalese disclaimers, such as, "Caution, don't drink the water.":ROFLMAO:
jmtseven, Laura and 5 others

Rank VI

Jun 26, 2021

#5
Thank you @David and @Laura for this article and putting it in the “BRONCO HOW TO” forum.
TK1215
Moderator

Grumpy as Necessary

Feb 10, 2022

#6
Yes, but just how "challenged" are they?
1644505447099.gif
KennyMac

Rank V

Feb 12, 2022

#7
I just wanna know why Ford engineering would put these channels in the floor that do NOT lead to the drain holes! Every floor/passenger location has one Screenshot_20220212-104003_Edge.jpg
Moderator

Grumpy as Necessary

Feb 12, 2022

#8
I just wanna know why Ford engineering would put these channels in the floor that do NOT lead to the drain holes! Every floor/passenger location has one View attachment 28565
Maybe they run some of the wiring harnesses underneath

Rank V

Feb 12, 2022

#9
Maybe they run some of the wiring harnesses underneath
Why would that matter? It's safe under a rubber floor
Moderator

Grumpy as Necessary

Feb 12, 2022

#10
Why would that matter? It's safe under a rubber floor
It might be a channel to run it thrrough

Rank V

Feb 12, 2022

#11
It might be a channel to run it thrrough
Nah... It's just a dumb, stylistic groove in the floor that's blocked off at either end to the drain hole. Serves no purpose.

Rank IV

Feb 15, 2022

#12
Can we get the layout for 2 door with carpet?? Also, has anyone pulled their carpet up? I wonder what the status of the flooring underneath is in consideration of a "carpet delete". I've had mine since late november and have already been in some pretty good mud and even driven down river a few times, I got the Ford floor liners, but not sure they are enough the more I do and the dirtier and muddier they get.0E8C9FE2-03C3-4F50-8DD5-A73D688A30CF_1_105_c.jpeg
JAYP, KennyMac

Rank XII

Feb 15, 2022

#13
1644960756081.png
Deano Bronc, Sdakotabronco and 1 other

Rank VI

Feb 16, 2022

#14
By Laura Zielinski



The washout flooring of the Bronco is high on many customers’ wish lists, especially those who plan on using their vehicle in the dirt and mud. Drain plugs may be a non-negotiable option for some, yet nearly everyone would say they are a “nice to have.”

Washout floors with drain plugs come standard on Black Diamond and Badlands. To stick with the rubberized flooring on Badlands, you’ll need to keep the standard Marine Grade Vinyl (MGV) seating. Choosing leather-trimmed seating means moving to carpeted floors (which are easily protected with available floor liners).

Active vs. Passive Drain Plugs
Even carpeted Broncos have drain plugs. You won’t be hosing out a Bronco optioned that way, but Ford has added in passive drain plugs under the carpet in case water gets in to where it’s not supposed to be. There are six passive plugs in the passenger area of the 4-door models and one in the jack compartment.



These passive plugs carry over to Broncos with the washout floors as well. In addition to the seven passive drain plugs in the 4-doors, there are four active plugs. The reason for the passive drain plugs is to drain water that gets in below the rubberized wash-out liner – for example if you tackle an overly ambitious water crossing.

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3

Using the Active Plugs
Having MGV seats and washout flooring doesn’t mean you should douse the interior without care. Don’t flood the upholstery, and sponge or wipe down critical components like the dash.


To properly rinse down your Bronco’s floors, use a low-pressure garden hose –– not a power washer. Aim for a flow rate of 10 liters per minute.
  1. Pull out the floor mats, if equipped, to get to the plugs. Rotate the drain plugs counterclockwise to “open.”
  2. A good rule of thumb is to spray each zone for 30 seconds at a time, to prevent flooding. Aim for the highest part of the zone first, such as the sides of the transmission tunnel in the driver or passenger footwell. Rinse the debris toward the drain plug.
  3. Let the water drain for approximately 30 seconds.
  4. Repeat if necessary and move on to the next zone.
  5. Take care of visible puddles with a towel/sponge so you don’t cause mold or corrosion to develop.
  6. Rotate the plugs to “close.”
I thought a guy named James Edward Splanger invented a thing called the vacuum. You plug it into the outlet, hit a switch and it sucks all the dirt and stuff out of your vehicle. Now I know with all the conversion to wind power, if the wind is not blowing it might not work. Also using water is a big waste of that resource, NO?? I hope you neighbors are not, you know, one of them. I also hope these mats don't let the water between them and the metal floor so that orange stuff starts to form. We all know what happens to floor pans when it grows and creates baby orange stuff. Are these Alum floors? Now I'm not a big green person. SO I don't care...just food for thought for others!
KennyMac, Tommyphillips

Rank VI

Feb 16, 2022

#15
I thought a guy named James Edward Splanger invented a thing called the vacuum. You plug it into the outlet, hit a switch and it sucks all the dirt and stuff out of your vehicle. Now I know with all the conversion to wind power, if the wind is not blowing it might not work. Also using water is a big waste of that resource, NO?? I hope you neighbors are not, you know, one of them. I also hope these mats don't let the water between them and the metal floor so that orange stuff starts to form. We all know what happens to floor pans when it grows and creates baby orange stuff. Are these Alum floors? Now I'm not a big green person. SO I don't care...just food for thought for others!
Vacuum works ok but have you ever taken an old carpet out of a car? There's just stuff that will not come out. With allergies it's nice to not have carpet. I also have 3 dogs that will ride along on occasion. Dog hair is really a pain to Vacuum. Yes I do worry about "the baby orange stuff" so hope the washout floors are made well.
Tommyphillips

Rank III

Jul 09, 2022

#16
Question ..We have wildtrack and got caught out in a very heavy rain .vacuumed the carpet and wiped out the interior should i pull the carpet sides up and bow air underneath to assure that mildew or any smell will not accure ...im old school and if carpet got wet in a okder vehicle we pulled it and dryed it out
Deano Bronc

Rank VI

Jul 10, 2022

#17
It couldn't hurt to take it out but lifting it to dry it should work. I have a Black Diamond with the rubberized floor so I may not be the one to answer.
Tommyphillips
Moderator

Occasionally Grumpy

Jul 10, 2022

#18
Question ..We have wildtrack and got caught out in a very heavy rain .vacuumed the carpet and wiped out the interior should i pull the carpet sides up and bow air underneath to assure that mildew or any smell will not accure ...im old school and if carpet got wet in a okder vehicle we pulled it and dryed it out
To me, this goes under the category of "better to be safe than sorry".
If it's doable. I would try to dry it out the best you can. You don't want to take the chance of ruining your carpet and have to replace it. You also don't want any kind of musty smell.
Sdakotabronco, Tommyphillips

Rank III

Jul 15, 2022

#19
Thanks yall

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