Sasquatch with Aftermarket Lift - Why?

Padams7

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Hey guys! Looking to have an adult conversation here with some answers to some questions to see some reasoning behind why we are adding a Sasquatch Package, then adding an aftermarket lift and changing the wheels.

I understand the basics, “larger tires” - but after looking at the Zone and Rough Country Lifts, we are just adding a spacer, and changing the upper control arm.

Is adding a spacer lift worth it?

I changed shocks, springs, control arms, tie rod ends, sway links, track bars when I did a lift on my Wrangler - of course this was a solid axle compared to an IFS. Is IFS that much easier to lift?

Would it be easier for someone to buy a non-Sasquatch Bronco, add taller coil overs and change control arms and have a beefier suspension than a Sasquatch with a spacer lift?

I have a Badlands, non-Sasquatch, because after driving 240,000+ miles in a Jeep on 35’s, I was content being with 33’s, but may consider going back to a larger tire once I wear these out.

I understand there is now the Hoss 3.0 Suspension, there is now the Raptor and Everglades, but the Badlands even without Sasquatch outperforms a Rubicon in my mind, with the research and my driving style.

So again - would it be better for someone to go base, then add coil overs and control arms over spending an extra $5,000 on a Sasquatch Package only to add another few thousand dollars in new wheels and spacers and an upper control arm?

To me it doesn’t seem like the Sasquatch Package is a more valuable option, and if I can add a spacer to the Badlands and get an additional 3” (per Zones website) does that seem to be the way to go for new orders?

Please let me know how I may be wrong in this thinking.
 
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Westland

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I’ve had 2 Jeeps with aftermarket lift kits, one from Rough Country in particular…. All I can say is, after one year, on BOTH Jeeps, the only parts to rust out were the aftermarket parts. Word to the wise…

What Ford did was tremendous—producing a ready-made off-road SUV from the factory. Totally turn key. Yeah i know, some guys want 37’s and more lift, but this Bronco is as turn key as you can get from the factory. I’m satisfied.
 

byronpete21

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Same line of thinking for me on my Badlands build. Originally was going to pay for the Sasquatch upgrade but quickly realized my money could be spent better on other things. This especially is true if you want a manual transmission as the price of the automatic is baked into the Sasquatch package, but no rebate is offered if you don't want the automatic.
 

Deano Bronc

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Hey guys! Looking to have an adult conversation here with some answers to some questions to see some reasoning behind why we are adding a Sasquatch Package, then adding an aftermarket lift and changing the wheels.

I understand the basics, “larger tires” - but after looking at the Zone and Rough Country Lifts, we are just adding a spacer, and changing the upper control arm.

Is adding a spacer lift worth it?

I changed shocks, springs, control arms, tie rod ends, sway links, track bars when I did a lift on my Wrangler - of course this was a solid axle compared to an IFS. Is IFS that much easier to lift?

Would it be easier for someone to buy a non-Sasquatch Bronco, add taller coil overs and change control arms and have a beefier suspension than a Sasquatch with a spacer lift?

I have a Badlands, non-Sasquatch, because after driving 240,000+ miles in a Jeep on 35’s, I was content being with 33’s, but may consider going back to a larger tire once I wear these out.

I understand there is now the Hoss 3.0 Suspension, there is now the Raptor and Everglades, but the Badlands even without Sasquatch outperforms a Rubicon in my mind, with the research and my driving style.

So again - would it be better for someone to go base, then add coil overs and control arms over spending an extra $5,000 on a Sasquatch Package only to add another few thousand dollars in new wheels and spacers and an upper control arm?

To me it doesn’t seem like the Sasquatch Package is a more valuable option, and if I can add a spacer to the Badlands and get an additional 3” (per Zones website) does that seem to be the way to go for new orders?

Please let me know how I may be wrong in this thinking.
There are several advantages to the Sasquatch on the base, BB and BD series besides just tires and wheels. They include locking diffs, Advanced 4x4 and heavier duty front axles.
While it is true that you can lift and put larger tires on a Base, you still wouldn't have a lot of the same "perks" as getting a Squatch package on it.
 

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I changed shocks, springs, control arms, tie rod ends, sway links, track bars when I did a lift on my Wrangler - of course this was a solid axle compared to an IFS. Is IFS that much easier to lift?
I have a Badlands, non-Sasquatch, because after driving 240,000+ miles in a Jeep on 35’s, I was content being with 33’s, but may consider going back to a larger tire once I wear these out.
:oops: When I went from 33" to 35" tires on my Jeep JL Sahara, I only needed a $600 spacer lift. A 2" lift shouldn't require all the components you changed.

This is my honest opinion based on my personal experience. Most people moving into an off-road vehicle don't know what they need. I was the same way when I first started out. Some people bought the most capable off-road vehicle that Ford sells stock (Badlands w/Sas). Then they learned that to increase the capability of the stock vehicle means some of what they purchased will have to be replaced, leading to the question you posted; "Why did I add SAS if I was going to replace those components anyway?" It's only after they get some experience does their path to rock crawling nirvana becomes clear. This happens with new Jeep owners as we well. They grab a fully loaded Rubicon and learn its limitations, and then realize to get to the next step of capability will cost a fortune. Its at that time they spec out a Wrangler Sport with aftermarket axles, air lockers, and new suspension and realize they could have saved money by buying a Sport and upgrading it instead of buying a Rubicon and having to tear out half its guts anyway. Does that make sense?

I loved my JL with 35" tires and that is plenty for me and what I want to do with my Bronco. I got SAS because I know I'm not going to need more.
 

Padams7

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There are several advantages to the Sasquatch on the base, BB and BD series besides just tires and wheels. They include locking diffs, Advanced 4x4 and heavier duty front axles.
While it is true that you can lift and put larger tires on a Base, you still wouldn't have a lot of the same "perks" as getting a Squatch package on it.
You’re correct with the lockers - and the axles, forgot about that portion, cause I have the Badlands and it has all except the 4.7 gears. I didn’t even think about ordering a squatch base, having the same axles as the Badlands, then the upgrades from there! Good catch Deano! That makes more sense now.
 
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ResidualGenius

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Could not agree more, at least when it comes to the badlands. Seems like you can get what the squatch has for much less, with the aftermarket options.
NOt sure that as the price will start to add up when you include the gearing, lockers, and other upgraded components to match the SAS (given you do it correctly) plus you get the ADV4x4
 
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AcesandEights

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:oops: When I went from 33" to 35" tires on my Jeep JL Sahara, I only needed a $600 spacer lift. A 2" lift shouldn't require all the components you changed.
....
If the previous poster had a JL, you're spot on. You don't need most of the parts he/she/they bought to comfortably fit 35" tires. You can get a Teraflex spacer lift for between $400 - $500 and fit 35" tires. That being said, there are benefits to having the additional parts...you just don't "need" them.

It's just my opinion, but a vehicle should only be lifted enough to clear the tire you want to run and the tire you want to run should be based on the conditions, rocks, ruts, etc. So, there isn't any way to know the answer to whether a spacer lift is necessary, unless you also know how and where the vehicle will be run. The Sas adds a lot to some of the trims, but if you have a Badlands, Wildtrack or First Edition I wouldn't also pony up for any additional off road bits.
 

SS Bronco

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As some one who bought a Badlands with Sasquatch. Then added $5000 in coil overs , $3000 in wheels and tires and $1000 in up grading the steering. Sasquatch was still a good deal for the $2495. I could not of bought a spare set of 35” wheels and tires, geared both differential with 4.7 for that price.
 
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Oldhippie

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For me, the extra dollars of a badlands over the base Sasquatch will be spent in the aftermarket upgrading to make my Bronco truly Rubicon trail capable rather than paying for “creature comforts” I don’t need. My thinking is if ya want the “creature comforts” ya really aren’t looking for a serious off roader so don’t need the Sasquatch package to begin with (or ya just have money to burn)...
 

SS Bronco

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For me, the extra dollars of a badlands over the base Sasquatch will be spent in the aftermarket upgrading to make my Bronco truly Rubicon trail capable rather than paying for “creature comforts” I don’t need. My thinking is if ya want the “creature comforts” ya really aren’t looking for a serious off roader so don’t need the Sasquatch package to begin with (or ya just have money to burn)...
How have you liked wheeling your Base Sasquatch? Did you add aftermarket skid plates? Just wondering because haven’t seen that set up on the rubicon yet.
 

Oldhippie

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How have you liked wheeling your Base Sasquatch? Did you add aftermarket skid plates? Just wondering because haven’t seen that set up on the rubicon yet.
Well I don’t have it yet (still no build date) so it is not on the trail yet... but yes skids, bumpers, sliders at the minimum...maybe next summer...
 
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SS Bronco

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Well I don’t have it yet (still no build date) so it is not on the trail yet... but yes skids, bumpers, sliders at the minimum...maybe next summer...
Right on sounds good. After wheeling mine skid plates are a must. Compared to the originals the frame sits very low even with 35”.
 

mike8675309

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I think a body lift would provide more value on a sasquatch configured vehicle. It would let you put the 37s on without changing the geometry significantly.

 
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Oldhippie

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Right on sounds good. After wheeling mine skid plates are a must. Compared to the originals the frame sits very low even with 35”.
Right on sounds good. After wheeling mine skid plates are a must. Compared to the originals the frame sits very low even with 35”.
yeah, I discovered how low it is doing the Moab off-roadeo...waiting for a real lift for 37”s that adds articulation...the thing is really easy to three wheel also...but really I am old and most of my off roading is behind me but need the upright seating and open air comfortable driving the Bronco offers so it is really overkill for my needs but do want to prove I can still hit the trails....
 

the poacher

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Could not agree more, at least when it comes to the badlands. Seems like you can get what the squatch has for much less, with the aftermarket options.
I specifically ordered the badlands with the optional rims (non squatch) so that I have 33" to run during the winter months in Whistler, and run 37's during spring/summer and fall. This will cost me less money, and I get a better set up.
 
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I think a body lift would provide more value on a sasquatch configured vehicle. It would let you put the 37s on without changing the geometry significantly.

thats a decent video, I think 3" is crazy. With that being said I would entertain 1" to add a little clearance!

L.R.