Overland Bronco Insights with Overland Bound

allan

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With all the buzz surrounding the Overland Bronco build revealed at Super Cel E this week, we wanted to see what experienced overlanders are thinking about this rig. We chatted with our friends @Michael and @corrie from Overland Bound to get their take on this vehicle concept. Check out their thoughts and overland insights in this thread and leave your questions for Michael and Corrie!

1. As seasoned Overlanders, what does it mean to have this much interest being shown in a vehicle that is so squarely targeted at your community?
It warms the heart. Years ago, when Overland Bound was founded, adventure as a necessary part of living wasn’t embraced like it is now. Not only are folks getting back to nature with family and friends, but now more than ever they have the equipment and resources to do so safely.

2. The Bronco Overland Concept’s purpose seems to be to show the potential of the platform for vehicle dependent adventure travel. In what features and options will additional effort be required from Ford for that potential to be fully realized?
The key thing is they hit the basics in terms of core stats. You can’t hide lacking fundamentals from the community, and Bronco delivered. They hit approach angle, departure angle, break over angle, tire size, and torque. Overlanding ranges from the asphalt of a State Park to the Boulders of the Rubicon. Outfitting for your style of overlanding is essential. We need to see the extensive aftermarket community, and what type of capabilities we can add. I’d like to see sliders that will take the full weight of the vehicle on one side. I want to see options to go beyond the 150 lbs. dynamic load limit on the rack. You can’t overland without a snorkel (hahaha), is there an option available? Building an overland vehicle from the ground up is key. Sliders are first on my list, then winch bumper options, and skid plates. I also want to know which (if any) options and aftermarket parts would void my factory warranty? The list is quite long, but those are the basics.

3. What features and accessories of the Bronco Overland Concept are the most important for wilderness adventure travel?
It might surprise you that I’m not going to say the winch, limb risers, or a roof rack. I’m also not going to talk about the lights (sliders before light bars). You need storage. I could take a factory standard Bronco and overland all day long. I have to stay within the vehicle capabilities, but there are very few places I’d turn away from in the Bronco. Once you get too aggressive, it becomes a sport, not an overland trip (nothing wrong with that). With overlanding, you want to exercise mechanical sympathy, and you want your vehicle to get you there and back again. The factory standard bronco will do that in most places I want to go. With that said, my favorite feature is the storage and the consideration for flat spaces. A fold down table in the tailgate, slider for the fridge, and a shelf to tie down gear. That is extremely important, and for a long-term trip, one of the most important things. I could conceivably have an over-nighter without pulling anything out of my rig. The configuration looks like a 5-10-minute setup. If you are setting up and taking down 20 days a month, you have to keep setup time down.

4. It seems that an overlanding vehicle benefits from a delicate balance of power, off-road capability, size and storage capacity, and fuel efficiency. Given what we know about the Bronco Overland Concept, how would you grade it in those categories?
Yes, everything is a balance. That’s why we advocate for folks to first decide what types of adventure/overland travel they will do, then build a rig for a couple notches above that. There are so many options with the Bronco, you can configure for your style of travel. They’ve done a really good job. I currently drive a solid axle vehicle with lockers front, rear, center, which gets 11MPG. It's a very capable vehicle, but you can clearly see the Broncos got me beat on Mileage and Comfort with the Eco-Boost and IFS. Some may argue that my solid axle is tougher and more capable, but if we are talking about overall reliability, is my 1996 really more reliable than a 2021 Bronco? One area that comes up a lot among overland travelers is storage. Is the Bronco a weekender, or truly capable of long-term travel? I’d like to put some miles behind the wheel. Simple answer, I’d grade an A across the board, and I don’t hand out As’ lightly. Let’s face it, this is the most interesting new contender in the overland market for years.

5. You are on record for personally preferring ground tents to RTTs. What is your reaction to the factory roof rail system and its potential for roof top storage?
Yes, we prefer a ground tent for our use, which is Sierra travel in Northern California and most of the Southwestern States and Baja. Sleeping arrangements are very personal, and some much prefer RTTs. I’ve also done some light overlanding in Australia. If I were traveling through the Northern parts there, or in Africa, I would NOT prefer a ground tent since everything on the ground would like to cause your end. For our use, tents are faster and more convenient, plain and simple. That being said, roof top storage is essential, especially for long trips. With sleeping arrangements there is no right or wrong. The capability of a roof top tent provides more options for overlanders. In our book, that is only a good thing. The potential for roof storage even with removable panels shows that the Bronco team seriously considered the needs of adventure travelers.

6. Are there any pleasant surprises that Ford thought to include on this build that a lot of others might have overlooked?
Floor drains, trail sights (also limb-riser attachments), trail driving modes, and the Sasquatch package. The Sasquatch package is the kind of thing you see on the concept showroom, that never comes to market. The Bronco team actually delivered on that as a factory option. I have to add, they also struck a good balance of overall capabilities. you can build a beast Fordyce rock crawler, but from an overland perspective that’s only 5% of your travel. They did a good job with balance, and the vehicle will likely be able to go beyond most people’s requirements.

7. Any additional thoughts on the build?
What we have seen so far will accommodate 95% of the overland market. For the other 5% who need more winch, more armor, more storage, more X, we will have to see what the after-market vendors can provide safely. I think we have a very good vehicle on our hands.
 

David

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you can build a beast Fordyce rock crawler, but from an overland perspective that’s only 5% of your travel.
As someone who is very “overland curious”, I definitely feel that pull for the extreme rock crawling side of things. Probably has something to do with the beefy looking gear. But this puts things in perspective. Just get over the rocks you have to so you can continue your adventure.
 

BuzzyBud

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Hey, @allan and @David thank you for creating/contributing to this thread. I am out camping this weekend but wanted to add a few thoughts about the Overland Bronco.
  • I really like how Ford is connecting the Bronco to overland travel. I have long been a believer in frequent short duration (2 nights) camping trips which are off the beaten path. Keep it self-contained and focused on fun and buyers will see the value.
  • I also love how Ford understands the desire on the part of the buyer to customize their Bronco to their unique needs. By supporting the idea of a customized factory build, Ford allows the owner to “hit the ground running” with all the gear they need to immediately begin overland travel. After a few camping trips the owner can tweak the rig based on their learning experiences. This is the essence of lifelong learning.
  • Ford recognizes the overland/camping community by reaching out to long established social media figures and their fan base. Entities such as Overland Bound and Last Line of Defense have been plugged into the heart and soul of overland camping and can aid Ford as they expand the community of enthusiasts long dominated by Jeep, Land Rover and Toyota.
  • When I saw the unveiling of the Bronco Overland rig, my reaction was, “OMG, that is Mike’s rig”! I speak of Mike, the YouTube influencer whose channel is titled, “Last Line of Defense”. I happen to be a fan of LLOD since his approach to overlanding and camping is like mine.
  • As we look ahead to the future, I hope to see many BN/LLOD videos with this Bronco driven by Mike on Black Bear Pass and many other trails around the country.
  • Ford might also consider an ongoing presence at the Overland Expo events starting on May 14, 2021 in Arizona. I would welcome an opportunity to meet Mike, Ashley and their dog Atreyu in this Bronco Overland vehicle representing Ford’s overland travel initiative.
Hope this is helpful.
 
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gibsBRonCO

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Great insight on an overlanding build. The Fordyce comment caught my attention as well. We overnighted on Fordyce last summer with my '76 Bronco crawler. Only one night and we were able to easily carry everything needed. More nights would have been tough and would have added weight making the winch hills harder. That said, I plan on doing more and longer overlanding trips in the future. #epicadventure
 

David

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Hey, @allan and @David thank you for creating/contributing to this thread. I am out camping this weekend but wanted to add a few thoughts about the Overland Bronco.
  • I really like how Ford is connecting the Bronco to overland travel. I have long been a believer in frequent short duration (2 nights) camping trips which are off the beaten path. Keep it self-contained and focused on fun and buyers will see the value.
  • I also love how Ford understands the desire on the part of the buyer to customize their Bronco to their unique needs. By supporting the idea of a customized factory build, Ford allows the owner to “hit the ground running” with all the gear they need to immediately begin overland travel. After a few camping trips the owner can tweak the rig based on their learning experiences. This is the essence of lifelong learning.
  • Ford recognizes the overland/camping community by reaching out to long established social media figures and their fan base. Entities such as Overland Bound and Last Line of Defense have been plugged into the heart and soul of overland camping and can aid Ford as they expand the community of enthusiasts long dominated by Jeep, Land Rover and Toyota.
  • When I saw the unveiling of the Bronco Overland rig, my reaction was, “OMG, that is Mike’s rig”! I speak of Mike, the YouTube influencer whose channel is titled, “Last Line of Defense”. I happen to be a fan of LLOD since his approach to overlanding and camping is like mine.
  • As we look ahead to the future, I hope to see many BN/LLOD videos with this Bronco driven by Mike on Black Bear Pass and many other trails around the country.
  • Ford might also consider an ongoing presence at the Overland Expo events starting on May 14, 2021 in Arizona. I would welcome an opportunity to meet Mike, Ashley and their dog Atreyu in this Bronco Overland vehicle representing Ford’s overland travel initiative.
Hope this is helpful.
@BuzzyBud , Thanks for the feedback! Wilderness adventure travel is a space that we love and we can't wait to see what folks like LLOD and Overland Bound do with Broncos. Provided they actually take the leap to get Broncos. :p
 

BuzzyBud

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@BuzzyBud , Thanks for the feedback! Wilderness adventure travel is a space that we love and we can't wait to see what folks like LLOD and Overland Bound do with Broncos. Provided they actually take the leap to get Broncos. :p
Not sure about Michael at Overland Bound. I do know Mike at LLOD has an early reservation in on a 4 door Bronco Badlands in A51. Although he has three Toyota vehicles, I sense he really admires what Ford has achieved.

Ford marketing has really adapted well to a changing environment as more and more buyers are shifting to electronic media for product analysis and purchasing. Ford also understands how buyers need to have a vision of the product equipped and in the environment they seek.

I have a vision of a symbiotic relationship between social media influencers and Ford. The influencers like Mike will need to adapt their content to what buyers want to see. They also need sponsors to survive. Ford will need to continue embracing social media and the people who will test, equip, and show potential buyers, as well as existing owners, how a Bronco can help them live their adventures.

We live in an exciting time!
 

Khayze427

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With all the buzz surrounding the Overland Bronco build revealed at Super Cel E this week, we wanted to see what experienced overlanders are thinking about this rig. We chatted with our friends @Michael and @corrie from Overland Bound to get their take on this vehicle concept. Check out their thoughts and overland insights in this thread and leave your questions for Michael and Corrie!

1. As seasoned Overlanders, what does it mean to have this much interest being shown in a vehicle that is so squarely targeted at your community?
It warms the heart. Years ago, when Overland Bound was founded, adventure as a necessary part of living wasn’t embraced like it is now. Not only are folks getting back to nature with family and friends, but now more than ever they have the equipment and resources to do so safely.

2. The Bronco Overland Concept’s purpose seems to be to show the potential of the platform for vehicle dependent adventure travel. In what features and options will additional effort be required from Ford for that potential to be fully realized?
The key thing is they hit the basics in terms of core stats. You can’t hide lacking fundamentals from the community, and Bronco delivered. They hit approach angle, departure angle, break over angle, tire size, and torque. Overlanding ranges from the asphalt of a State Park to the Boulders of the Rubicon. Outfitting for your style of overlanding is essential. We need to see the extensive aftermarket community, and what type of capabilities we can add. I’d like to see sliders that will take the full weight of the vehicle on one side. I want to see options to go beyond the 150 lbs. dynamic load limit on the rack. You can’t overland without a snorkel (hahaha), is there an option available? Building an overland vehicle from the ground up is key. Sliders are first on my list, then winch bumper options, and skid plates. I also want to know which (if any) options and aftermarket parts would void my factory warranty? The list is quite long, but those are the basics.

3. What features and accessories of the Bronco Overland Concept are the most important for wilderness adventure travel?
It might surprise you that I’m not going to say the winch, limb risers, or a roof rack. I’m also not going to talk about the lights (sliders before light bars). You need storage. I could take a factory standard Bronco and overland all day long. I have to stay within the vehicle capabilities, but there are very few places I’d turn away from in the Bronco. Once you get too aggressive, it becomes a sport, not an overland trip (nothing wrong with that). With overlanding, you want to exercise mechanical sympathy, and you want your vehicle to get you there and back again. The factory standard bronco will do that in most places I want to go. With that said, my favorite feature is the storage and the consideration for flat spaces. A fold down table in the tailgate, slider for the fridge, and a shelf to tie down gear. That is extremely important, and for a long-term trip, one of the most important things. I could conceivably have an over-nighter without pulling anything out of my rig. The configuration looks like a 5-10-minute setup. If you are setting up and taking down 20 days a month, you have to keep setup time down.

4. It seems that an overlanding vehicle benefits from a delicate balance of power, off-road capability, size and storage capacity, and fuel efficiency. Given what we know about the Bronco Overland Concept, how would you grade it in those categories?
Yes, everything is a balance. That’s why we advocate for folks to first decide what types of adventure/overland travel they will do, then build a rig for a couple notches above that. There are so many options with the Bronco, you can configure for your style of travel. They’ve done a really good job. I currently drive a solid axle vehicle with lockers front, rear, center, which gets 11MPG. It's a very capable vehicle, but you can clearly see the Broncos got me beat on Mileage and Comfort with the Eco-Boost and IFS. Some may argue that my solid axle is tougher and more capable, but if we are talking about overall reliability, is my 1996 really more reliable than a 2021 Bronco? One area that comes up a lot among overland travelers is storage. Is the Bronco a weekender, or truly capable of long-term travel? I’d like to put some miles behind the wheel. Simple answer, I’d grade an A across the board, and I don’t hand out As’ lightly. Let’s face it, this is the most interesting new contender in the overland market for years.

5. You are on record for personally preferring ground tents to RTTs. What is your reaction to the factory roof rail system and its potential for roof top storage?
Yes, we prefer a ground tent for our use, which is Sierra travel in Northern California and most of the Southwestern States and Baja. Sleeping arrangements are very personal, and some much prefer RTTs. I’ve also done some light overlanding in Australia. If I were traveling through the Northern parts there, or in Africa, I would NOT prefer a ground tent since everything on the ground would like to cause your end. For our use, tents are faster and more convenient, plain and simple. That being said, roof top storage is essential, especially for long trips. With sleeping arrangements there is no right or wrong. The capability of a roof top tent provides more options for overlanders. In our book, that is only a good thing. The potential for roof storage even with removable panels shows that the Bronco team seriously considered the needs of adventure travelers.

6. Are there any pleasant surprises that Ford thought to include on this build that a lot of others might have overlooked?
Floor drains, trail sights (also limb-riser attachments), trail driving modes, and the Sasquatch package. The Sasquatch package is the kind of thing you see on the concept showroom, that never comes to market. The Bronco team actually delivered on that as a factory option. I have to add, they also struck a good balance of overall capabilities. you can build a beast Fordyce rock crawler, but from an overland perspective that’s only 5% of your travel. They did a good job with balance, and the vehicle will likely be able to go beyond most people’s requirements.

7. Any additional thoughts on the build?
What we have seen so far will accommodate 95% of the overland market. For the other 5% who need more winch, more armor, more storage, more X, we will have to see what the after-market vendors can provide safely. I think we have a very good vehicle on our hands.
A. A GooseGear platform to replace the rear seats and a “pop-up” top, would be perfect.
 

jmalinov

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hey @David and perhaps @BuzzyBud -- what is this accessory thats in the back the "cargo management system that locks" -- is that in the order catalog now? i'm trying to find it..
 

Slownstddy

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Thanks to @Michael and @corrie for thier avice and assessments. And to everyone else who helps with getting the overlanding "concept" to the adventurous beginners.
My question is more of performance longevity, they touched on the dynamic load weight of the overhead cargo system but overall GVWR are quite low when considering overlanding on long trips. I'm about 250lbs and with my wife dogs and fridge we seem to almost max out the GVWR of the Squatched Badlands with 2.7/auto. I was hoping that sombody would have addressed how it related to maxing out the GVWR overlanding over time since that was our sole purpose for getting the Bronco.
 

BuzzyBud

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Thanks bud! Follow up — do I need this? Lol
If you have concerns regarding vehicle weight, you may want to hold off. Once you get your Bronco you could load it up with your essentials and visit a CAT Scales location to help you determine how much extra weight you can safely add.