New Bronco Engine Information

Which engine are you ordering for your Bronco.

  • 2.3L Ecoboost I4

    Votes: 58 27.5%
  • 2.7L Ecoboost V6

    Votes: 153 72.5%

  • Total voters
    211

David

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By Dusty Rhodes
Over the last week, Ford has released fuel economy and horsepower ratings for the 2021 Bronco. The results were an improvement over “preliminary specs.” The figures also show what we all expected: The Bronco is capable of going toe to toe with the Wrangler in both fuel economy and horsepower. And enthusiasts are finding the numbers comforting as well. With the all-new Bronco, I’ll nearly double both my horsepower and fuel economy compared to what I get from the three Gen 1 and Gen 2 Broncos in my garage.


The real story of these powertrains is not just horsepower and fuel economy performance, however, but the tweaks made to meet the demands of a credible off-road vehicle. The engineers at Ford inherited two engines that already met the grueling and comprehensive list of Ford truck durability standards –– the same two engines that have made the F150 the #1 selling vehicle for 44 years and Ranger a global success.

Angles That Will Make You Pucker
With a long list of additional off-road standards being added to the engineering requirements, one challenge that surfaced was keeping both the 2.3L and 2.7L engines properly lubricated in aggressive terrain. John Kilby, Engine Systems Engineer at Ford, told Bronco Nation that the rear oil sumps were upgraded, and the oil pans enlarged to deliver adequate pressure at a 45 degree downhill angle and a 30 degree side slope –– not bad. The larger pans mean the Bronco will hold seven quarts of oil (the Ranger uses six). This will ensure Bronco engines maintain standards under the demands of off-roading.



To put those capabilities into perspective: For most beginner or novice off roaders, a 35-degree downhill slope or 20- or 25-degree side slope would be sufficient to cause the driver to pucker and passengers to reach for the grab handles.

Nearly Three Dozen Unique Parts
Overall, 33 unique parts were engineered to ensure the Bronco met the rigors of off-road use purposefully established for it. These include the ability to wade in water 33.5 inches deep, which created the need for engineers to develop a new shield to protect the alternator. That may seem like a minor addition, but with the Bronco’s sophisticated electrical ecosystem adjusting the powertrain performance and the traction control systems selected via Ford’s patented G.O.A.T. modes, this shield will protect a vital component under extreme conditions.

Important updates were also made to the turbochargers to ensure seamless throttle response while delivering the Ford durability standards. The new Bronco uses electronically actuated monoscroll turbochargers versus pneumatically actuated versions, improving control and throttle response.

To fit these twin-turbochargers under the hood of the 2.7L-equipped Bronco, the right-hand side turbo is upswept while the left-hand side is down swept. This allowed engineers to fit the powertrain in the required under-hood envelope while managing the extreme temperatures generated by the exhaust.

For those of us who like to do our own maintenance, you’ll be relieved to hear the 2.7L engine is equipped with a well-thought-out oil canister mounted in an accessible location on the top front of the engine. The 2.3L has a more traditional filter mounted in the wheel well area of the driver side of the vehicle, a spot which has provided much fodder in Ranger forums the last couple of years.

Should Have Had a V8?
The final specifications for the two engines available for the Bronco were a pleasant surprise for most enthusiasts and reservations holders. For those arguing the need for an American V8, let me leave you with a few data points to consider.

• The 2021 Chevrolet Silverado 5.3-liter V8 delivers 383 pound-feet of torque.
• The 2021 RAM 1500 5.7-liter V8 delivers 410 pound-feet of torque.
• The 2021 Ford Bronco 2.7L V6 will deliver 415 pound-feet of torque.

Simply put, horsepower translates into speed, while torque should be viewed as strength. It is torque that will provide the most benefit in high- and low-speed off-roading –– exactly what the all-new Bronco excels at.
 

AcesandEights

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"The results were an improvement over “preliminary specs.” The figures also show what we all expected: The Bronco is capable of going toe to toe with the Wrangler in both fuel economy and horsepower."

Just seems like a redirection to me. Horsepower and torque aren't as important as mileage, day to day. Most people aren't using the max horsepower and max torque in their daily commute, on road, or off. Most people won't realize the benefit of the slight improvement in those numbers. What they do see everyday is the dollars that are put into the tank. Wrangler gets, in some cases, 35% better mileage. That translates to 35% money in your pocket when fueling up.

Dusty's "article" is a parlor trick. Hey, look here, at lean angles, not over there where the man behind the curtain is pulling the levers that impact your wallet. Dusty is saying, hey guys, look at these numbers, yeah, over here, and don't pay attention to those day-to-day impactful numbers that are much less than most people expected. I'm tired of people telling me what's important, the marketing highlights. It's all marketing BS.

The V8 argument, the argument for a NA V8 has nothing to do with horsepower and torque.
 

Bronco5.0

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V8?
The final specifications for the two engines available for the Bronco was a pleasant surprise for most enthusiasts and reservations holders. For those arguing the need for an American V8, let me leave you with a few data points to consider.

• The 2021 Chevrolet Silverado 5.3-liter V8 delivers 383 pound-feet of torque.
• The 2021 RAM 1500 5.7-liter V8 delivers 410 pound-feet of torque.
• The 2021 Ford Bronco 2.7L V6 will deliver 415 pound-feet of torque.

Simply put, horsepower translates into speed, while torque should be viewed as strength. It is torque that will provide the most benefit in high- and low-speed off-roading –– exactly what the all-new Bronco excels at.

Its not about peak numbers but what the numbers are in certain rpm ranges, the boosted V-6 makes big numbers at nose bleed rpm levels. The V-8 has power off idle, not 5500 rpm.
Horse power is a function of torque. Horse power is a fictitious number, power is measured in torque and is the only number.
The power needs to be at rpm levels the 2.7 is off boost, it will never match a larger NA engine for power in the 0-3000 rpm range.
The Coyote isn't the engine for the Bronco, but the cheaper and smaller Windsor block can out power a 2.7 with ease in the 0-3000 range.
The power output from the 2.7 is moot because its not mated to a manual.Its the 2.3 power that is being questioned.Ford should have given us a NA option, if not a V-8 the 3.3 would have been a starting point.
We're customers and stock holders asking Ford for options, but unless you want a turbo 6 with a slushbox and 4 doors we won't be heard?
 

Norderwurm

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It just... Kind of dissapoints. The brush off on the mpg. I opted for the 2.3 on my squatched OBX because I figured it had plenty of power for what I needed and it HAD to have better mpg than a twin turboed V6, right? Now... I have a smaller, less powerful engine with nearly the same mpg as the bigger option. Is there a point any longer to have the 2.3 with a squatched build? Did I make a collasal mistake? I haven't questioned anything up until now, haven't been salty about the delays are second guessed my order to oblivion, but this just kind of leaves me ...meh. why even make the 2.3 an option with the squatch package?

Not going to cancel my order or do anything stupid, but this is the first time I've felt any dissapointment with this process

Maybe if I put it into eco mode on my hour commute... whenever I get it
 

tlowell01

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I'm tired of people telling me what's important, the marketing highlights. It's all marketing BS.

The V8 argument, the argument for a NA V8 has nothing to do with horsepower and torque.
It is literally impossible for Ford to make a vehicle that is everything to everyone. They made choices and compromises. They have made a fully capable off roader. Are the MPG ratings really that different from a comparable Jeep with 35" tires, lower gearing, armor, etc? Would you expect anything else from Ford marketing than to explain the choices they made in the most favorable possible light? If sensitivity to miles per gallon is a prospective buyer's primary concern, they should be looking at a Prius, not a Bronco. If they do want a Bronco, then go with a non-squatched Base, Big Bend, or Outer Banks. It's when you start putting on the offroad goodies that the MPG's take a hit. Ford SHOULD have released this information prior to people putting their orders in so they could make a fully informed decision, but so few people have had their builds scheduled, that most people can still make changes to their build if they want something that drives better MPG's.

I do promise I'm not trolling here, but if not power (HP and torque), what is the argument for a NA V8?
 

Bronco5.0

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I do promise I'm not trolling here, but if not power (HP and torque), what is the argument for a NA V8?
Cost, it is cheaper to build a NA engine than a turbo motor and all its ancillary gear.
Cheaper to just install an engine than the engine, intercooler and all the plumbing.
Cheaper to maintain.
Smoother power delivery.
Less requirement for high octane gas.
 

AcesandEights

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@tlowell01 Honest answer, I don't want turbos. I worked for one of the largest dealer networks in the country, handling extended warranty claims, warranty claims outside of the manufacturer warranty. The only claims I handled were on used vehicles, or vehicles that had an extended warranty that went past the regular manufacturer warranty (50k miles). Important note: I purchased this Bronco to keep for many years, well outside of the manufacturer powertrain warranty.

I replaced turbos (and associated parts) every.single.day. If I could choose, knowing absolutely nothing, between two motors, I would choose the naturally aspirated motor every time. The biggest drawback, and one that has had me second-guessing my choice to buy a Bronco, is the turbo(s).

If the Bronco is a person's play thing for a couple years, a lease vehicle, something they won't have for 50k miles, then this won't be an issue. But, for me, I keep vehicles well-past the warranty period.
 

TK1215

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I am curious as to the weight differences on the engines whether it be 2.3, 2.7 or the 5.0? Aluminum or cast iron blocks? How do these things factor into cost or safety? Can a V8 be shoehorned in? Aren’t there many things, a balance that must be struck, to get a vehicle that will cover both on and off-road situations? to make a more capable vehicle? Some of the best off road vehicles ever made had very little HP, Torque, mileage or ground clearance. Yet they were transformed into the owners vision of what they should be. Those vehicles usually never drove on the street. With the advent of technology vast improvements have come, but at a cost. many of the beautiful off road vehicles that have been modified for serious off roading adventure are truly dangerous on the road and highway. And many of those never see the dirt. I am not saying that any of this rollout has been smooth, but Ford is building a dual purpose vehicle here. It is capable on and off road. You can get it mild, to pretty damn wild. Right from the factory, with the warranty. You can get, from all that we’ve seen, a badass off-road vehicle that in my opinion is very, very capable and safe. Does it get 30 MPG? Nope. In stead of always looking at what the Bronco isn’t, how about we actually look at what it is? I for one didn’t get it for mileage.
 

Flourman

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Cost, it is cheaper to build a NA engine than a turbo motor and all its ancillary gear.
Cheaper to just install an engine than the engine, intercooler and all the plumbing.
Cheaper to maintain.
Smoother power delivery.
Less requirement for high octane gas.
I really don’t think you are going to win anyone over on this V8 deal at this point. I suppose you’d want a carb’ed V8 because FI is too complicated. Guess what, NA diesel motors are cheaper to produce and maintain but how many of those do you see anymore?

The EB motors are great motors. The fuel economy can change drastically is you are in the boost or not. Stay out of the boost and you’ll get some really great numbers. I personally think people will see better Econ numbers if they stay off the skinny pedal.

This whole deal about “V8’s make their torque right off idle”. That’s what gearing is for. I’m also willing to bet once people get those turbos spooled up, they’ll long forget the “shoulda had a V8 deal”
 

tlowell01

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It just... Kind of dissapoints. The brush off on the mpg. I opted for the 2.3 on my squatched OBX because I figured it had plenty of power for what I needed and it HAD to have better mpg than a twin turboed V6, right? Now... I have a smaller, less powerful engine with nearly the same mpg as the bigger option. Is there a point any longer to have the 2.3 with a squatched build? Did I make a collasal mistake? I haven't questioned anything up until now, haven't been salty about the delays are second guessed my order to oblivion, but this just kind of leaves me ...meh. why even make the 2.3 an option with the squatch package?

Not going to cancel my order or do anything stupid, but this is the first time I've felt any dissapointment with this process

Maybe if I put it into eco mode on my hour commute... whenever I get it
So I guess, a couple of thoughts. For a squatch'd rig, it is 1 MPG better than the V6 which amounts to ~5.5% better MPG's. Not huge, but it is something. It's also $1,900 cheaper to purchase.

If you watch and/or read people's experiences from the ride alongs at KOH and Super Cel-E, I've not seen a single complaint about power from the 4-cyl from either the drivers or the riders. Additionally, if you read reviews of the Ranger, there is nothing universal praise for the powertrain.

All indications are that the 4-Cyl is going to be a great engine on the Bronco with plenty of power. The V-6 will have more, but if the 4-Cyl gives you everything you will really need, will you care?

The great thing about the Sasquatch package is that it gives you the max offroad capability across the product line from Base to FE right from the factory. You don't have to spring for the top of the line to get it. But a compromise you make for that off road capability is the on-road penalty of lower MPG's.

I don't think you'll be the least bit disappointed with your engine choice! Besides, you can just look around on that hour commute at all the jealous faces gawking at your bad*ss rig!
 

TK1215

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I really don’t think you are going to win anyone over on this V8 deal at this point. I suppose you’d want a carb’ed V8 because FI is too complicated. Guess what, NA diesel motors are cheaper to produce and maintain but how many of those do you see anymore?

The EB motors are great motors. The fuel economy can change drastically is you are in the boost or not. Stay out of the boost and you’ll get some really great numbers. I personally think people will see better Econ numbers if they stay off the skinny pedal.

This whole deal about “V8’s make their torque right off idle”. That’s what gearing is for. I’m also willing to bet once people get those turbos spooled up, they’ll long forget the “shoulda had a V8 deal”
Be careful, thems is fiiitun words!:ROFLMAO:
 

TK1215

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So I guess, a couple of thoughts. For a squatch'd rig, it is 1 MPG better than the V6 which amounts to ~5.5% better MPG's. Not huge, but it is something. It's also $1,900 cheaper to purchase.

If you watch and/or read people's experiences from the ride alongs at KOH and Super Cel-E, I've not seen a single complaint about power from the 4-cyl from either the drivers or the riders. Additionally, if you read reviews of the Ranger, there is nothing universal praise for the powertrain.

All indications are that the 4-Cyl is going to be a great engine on the Bronco with plenty of power. The V-6 will have more, but if the 4-Cyl gives you everything you will really need, will you care?

The great thing about the Sasquatch package is that it gives you the max offroad capability across the product line from Base to FE right from the factory. You don't have to spring for the top of the line to get it. But a compromise you make for that off road capability is the on-road penalty of lower MPG's.

I don't think you'll be the least bit disappointed with your engine choice! Besides, you can just look around on that hour commute at all the jealous faces gawking at your bad*ss rig!
I second the motion......or I second that emotion!
 
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tlowell01

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@tlowell01 Honest answer, I don't want turbos. I worked for one of the largest dealer networks in the country, handling extended warranty claims, warranty claims outside of the manufacturer warranty. The only claims I handled were on used vehicles, or vehicles that had an extended warranty that went past the regular manufacturer warranty (50k miles). Important note: I purchased this Bronco to keep for many years, well outside of the manufacturer powertrain warranty.

I replaced turbos (and associated parts) every.single.day. If I could choose, knowing absolutely nothing, between two motors, I would choose the naturally aspirated motor every time. The biggest drawback, and one that has had me second-guessing my choice to buy a Bronco, is the turbo(s).

If the Bronco is a person's play thing for a couple years, a lease vehicle, something they won't have for 50k miles, then this won't be an issue. But, for me, I keep vehicles well-past the warranty period.
Thanks for the explanation, I really was curious.

I plan on keeping mine for the duration too. I'm 100% sure this will be my last vehicle with a MT and most likely an ICE. The winds are blowing electric.

I'm less worried about mechanical components. They might be expensive to replace, but they'll be available. I see the electronics as the bigger worry. How long is Ford going to support the software that controls most every aspect of the car? If the infotainment processor goes out in 15 years, will Ford have enough stock to replace it? Same thing with ECU. The obsolescence of electronic components happens way sooner than mechanical parts!

Of course, I say that and am getting the Lux package for the tech/creature/safety features that are all powered by those same electronic components. :unsure::unsure::unsure:
 

Bronco5.0

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I really don’t think you are going to win anyone over on this V8 deal at this point. I suppose you’d want a carb’ed V8 because FI is too complicated. Guess what, NA diesel motors are cheaper to produce and maintain but how many of those do you see anymore?

The EB motors are great motors. The fuel economy can change drastically is you are in the boost or not. Stay out of the boost and you’ll get some really great numbers. I personally think people will see better Econ numbers if they stay off the skinny pedal.

This whole deal about “V8’s make their torque right off idle”. That’s what gearing is for. I’m also willing to bet once people get those turbos spooled up, they’ll long forget the “shoulda had a V8 deal”
Have you ever driven offroad?
 
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