Base with Sasquatch Walk Around

Is Base with Sasquatch for you?

  • Yep, that's my build.

    Votes: 21 42.9%
  • Nope, please show without Sasquatch.

    Votes: 11 22.4%
  • Nope, I'm going for something a bit less...base-y.

    Votes: 17 34.7%

  • Total voters
    49

David

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Mar 19, 2020
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By @Laura

One of the biggest perceived barriers to getting off the pavement and onto the “insert landscape of your choice” is the vehicle you are driving. Capability is a concern many of us have had, especially when transitioning to an unfamiliar vehicle or terrain. Your buddies will brush off damage (“It’ll buff out.”), but who really wants to get stuck –– or worse?
Until my first true trip off road in my friend’s Wrangler, my own experiences were limited. At the time, my Jeep was an ‘89 Cherokee, and it was stock –– unless you count the previous owner’s… let’s call it creative … wiring jobs. Even though I had my dad’s old off-roading how-to books and a good amount of common sense, I felt like it was best to stick to the asphalt.
My name’s Laura, and I recently joined Bronco Nation as a content contributor. You’ll be hearing more about my background in off roading, outdoor adventure, and the switch from Jeeps in the coming days. But until then, label me as a newbie Bronco enthusiast with a traditionalist bent on the way to her new vehicle choice.
So back to vehicle capabilities, and specifically, the 2021 Ford Bronco Base model. It’s the one that many of us are comparing against the other Bronco models — but is it enough to have some serious experiences off road? Yes, 100%. And there are other pluses, as well.
  • Price: The Base is the most cost-effective way to get into the 2021 Bronco family. Starting at $28,500, the 2-Door model isn’t a crazy spend, with no sacrifice in style or capability.
  • Interior: One of my Jeeps has power windows and locks, but I prefer the crank windows and manual locks on my other Jeep. As long as my arm works, they will work. While the Base interior does have power features, it doesn’t have all the bells and whistles like heated seats. To lots of people, that’s not a big deal, and actually, they enjoy it as it means less to go wrong.
  • Exterior: Fans of the Base like its old-school, stripped-down, bare-bones look — especially the 16” steelies. It feels the most reminiscent of the iconic body style from the previous generations of Broncos.
Some negatives of the Base, if you can even call them that, include:
  • Price: Yes, it’s a blessing and a curse. If you get the Sasquatch package ($4,995) and nothing else, you’re looking at close to $38k, which translates to a monthly payment of around $700. Start upgrading with Ford or on your own, and you’re getting into a sizeable situation.
  • Tow Package: There isn’t one. But you can add your own.
  • MPG: Outside the loyalist community, it’s very common for people to ask about the gas mileage. Inside the community, I think we all know we don’t buy our off-roading vehicles with the hopes of doing better at the pump. Ford has yet to release the exact figures for the Bronco models, but given the Base’s size and Sasquatch-package 35” tires, it probably will not be class-leading.




Now, Check out The Bronco Nation YouTube channel to see Jordan do a full walk-around interior and exterior review of the 2021 Ford Bronco Base with the Sasquatch package.


 
Last edited:

TorgSurv

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This video really opened my eyes about the floor liners. I never realized what they were and just skipped right over them when I was doing my build. From what I can see in the video, they look very nice, and more importantly, quite rugged. I'd love to see some more details on those, and clarification of material and design. B&P lists them as "Floor Liners - Front and Rear" for $160, but with no description of materials or extent of coverage. I assume that "front and rear" means the seating areas, not the cargo area. The order guide also lists a "Cargo Area Protector" (not in B&P yet): is that the liner we see in the cargo area of this video? I'd love to see some close-up shots of both the cargo and passenger area liners, and details of how they fit at the edges and openings, how far under the seat they go, etc.
 

TEEDEE

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Feb 4, 2021
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I really like this build--most of the right stuff and it looks GREAT! I would order a two door black Sasquatch and leave it at that, if I could wait until 22', . We originally reserved a base with Sasquatch, but inched up all the way to a loaded Badlands--it's only money, right?
As always, great job on the video.
Hi Laura! Welcome. I'm really looking forward to your perspective
 

67BroncoG1

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Feb 3, 2021
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That’s a Pretty capable vehicle for the money. (y)
Nice job on the video
The BaseSquatch is as capable and anything built at any price. At least anything short of a Unimog. The only functional difference between the BaseSquatch and BL Squatch is the disconnectable sway bar. The aftermarket will have quick disconnect pins out within weeks of customer delivery.
 

EBG

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May 20, 2020
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Sasquatch package should INCLUDE "Rock Crawl" Goat mode (at the least) and disconnecting sway bar. The sway bar will be easy enough to add DIY later (either from another, wrecked Bronco, or aftermarket) adding Goat Modes may be a little more difficult. I won't be surprised if someone hacks the firmware and makes adding modes possible before too long. I couldn't care less about charging pads or halo headlights or stuff like that, it's a BRONCO, not a ricer.
 
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May 21, 2020
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Sasquatch package should INCLUDE "Rock Crawl" Goat mode (at the least) and disconnecting sway bar. The sway bar will be easy enough to add DIY later (either from another, wrecked Bronco, or aftermarket) adding Goat Modes may be a little more difficult. I won't be surprised if someone hacks the firmware and makes adding modes possible before too long. I couldn't care less about charging pads or halo headlights or stuff like that, it's a BRONCO, not a ricer.
I want to find out how to obtain the schematics for hero switches and read into how I can get a sway bar system from a wrecked Bronco. Also the MGV seats! I’m an A&P mechanic with good experience, can’t be rocket science. :ROFLMAO:
 

EBG

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I want to find out how to obtain the schematics for hero switches and read into how I can get a sway bar system from a wrecked Bronco. Also the MGV seats! I’m an A&P mechanic with good experience, can’t be rocket science. :ROFLMAO:
When I attended the Texas Off-Rodeo, I had the opportunity to crawl under several Broncos there, some with the disconnecting sway bar, some without. Also, there was a disconnecting sway bar assembly mounted on a display stand to show how it works. I can say with reasonable confidence that the assembly simply bolts to the chassis, and plugs in with a wiring harness for power to the locking mechanism. Removing the assembly from a wrecked Bronco (sad to say that, but it will happen) in the future and bolting it in place of a regular front sway bar really does look like simple R&R. Wiring it through a relay and controlled from a "hero" switch, an AUX switch, or whatever switch you want to use, should be simple. I know that's one of the mods I'll be doing to my BaseSquatch asap. Wiring it for manual control means you won't have the benefit of the system that re-connects it automatically at speeds over 20 mph, but oh well.

I drove a Bronco with the disconnecting sway bar during the part of the course where one of the instructors had me put the vehicle on whoops, with the axles articulated to max. It was enough that they could step on the high corner and pivot the entire vehicle down so the opposite corner was up in the air. Then they had me hit the hero button to disconnect the bar, under load, and the entire vehicle tilted back to (relatively) level as the front suspension settled to let both front tires contact the ground.

The Bronco I drove both days during the rodeo on the trails was a Big Bend, with the regular sway bar. There were a few obstacles that had at least one of the tires up in the air, but with the lockers engaged, it was never a problem. Wet, slippery, mud-covered granite boulders on a steep uphill, off-camber, climb coming out of a muddy streambed? Sure. Crawl right up and over.
 
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