22 Wildtrak Stalled and gave out!

RedThor

Rank 0

Advocate II

Apr 9, 2022
5
10
68
Downey, Los Angeles County, California, United States
First Name
Alex
Last Name
Garcia
Hello Bronco family, I have a 22 Wildtrak with 1800 miles, I took it to some nearby trails. On an incline, the Bronco stalled, left me in a very bad position. I tried to restart it and it wouldnt. Check engine light came on and it asked for a “Manual Restart”. After that, it would crank but would Not start. Left me stranded. Has anybody had this issues? Sucks to have a brand new vehicle give out like that. Smh
 
  • Wow
Reactions: Jakob1972

okie4570

Rank V

Promoter II

May 21, 2020
820
1,665
1,713
Oklahoma
New vehicles still have issues on occasion. This isn't something new, it happens to all makes and models and years.
 

Bonnie6G

Rank VI

Champion II

Jan 19, 2021
436
887
3,501
Denver
First Name
Kyle
Last Name
Lesniak
Member #

2133

The ford shop will probably let you know best, but I’d suspect a fuel pump shut off somehow got triggered.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LR48 and Johnny Mo

Bob Blaylock

Rank III

Supporter I

Feb 20, 2022
121
223
771
59
N 38 29 W 121 26
First Name
Bob
Last Name
Blaylock
…but I’d suspect a fuel pump shut off somehow got triggered.
That could indeed be an issue with vehicles taken off-road.

It came to my full attention, some years ago, when I was diagnosing a fuel pump issue on my 1997 Contour. I traced the circuit all the way from the fusebox under the hood, back to the fuel pump itself. I'd had some faint awareness that modern cars had an impact-triggered cutoff to the fuel pump, to shut it down in the event of a collision, but this is the first time I actually saw it and gained true awareness of it. In the Contour, it's just ahead of the driver door.

It's only supposed to be trigger if there's a hard enough impact to suggest that the car may have been in a bad enough collision to rupture a fuel line or part of the fuel system, to keep the pump from pumping fuel out through that rupture; but I could see a very real possibility that in a vehicle taken off-road, it might be triggered by more normal activities. It'd probably be a very good idea for every owner of any off-road vehicle to know where this cutoff switch is, and how to reset it.

In the case of my Contour, no, that switch hadn't been triggered, at least not until I started tinkering with it, experimenting to see how it triggered, and how to reset it. It was the fuel pump itself that had gone bad, and needed to be replaced.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LR48 and Jakob1972

RedThor

Rank 0

Advocate II

Apr 9, 2022
5
10
68
Downey, Los Angeles County, California, United States
First Name
Alex
Last Name
Garcia
Yeah, these Broncos fuel pumps are too sensitive. I was on a rather easy trail with some ruts, this can be happening. Be aware of taking your Broncos trailing, that this is a major issue and they can and will leave you stranded. Until they fix it, we need to be really careful. What a bummer
 

Bob Blaylock

Rank III

Supporter I

Feb 20, 2022
121
223
771
59
N 38 29 W 121 26
First Name
Bob
Last Name
Blaylock
Yeah, these Broncos fuel pumps are too sensitive. I was on a rather easy trail with some ruts, this can be happening. Be aware of taking your Broncos trailing, that this is a major issue and they can and will leave you stranded. Until they fix it, we need to be really careful. What a bummer
There should be a way to reset it. It may have been deeply hidden in the manual for my Contour, but I only really gained awareness during the event I previously described, when I actually tinkered with the cutoff switch, saw how it triggers, and how to reset it. Easy if you know where it is, and how to reset it, but that knowledge is very obscure. I bet the same is exactly true on the Bronco—that there's a switch that is supposed to turn off in the event of what it detects as a collision, and that there's a very easy way to reset it, if you know how and where it is.
 

ChuckO

Rank VI

Champion I

May 8, 2022
457
738
3,501
Left Coast
First Name
Charles
Last Name
OBryan
Member #

5650

Would not pulling the negative terminal not reset the system? Granted, easier said than done on a nasty incline
 

Bonnie6G

Rank VI

Champion II

Jan 19, 2021
436
887
3,501
Denver
First Name
Kyle
Last Name
Lesniak
Member #

2133

Digging through some Ranger and F-150 forums, it seems their fuel inertia switches are located in the passenger front footwell area. Probably need to pull back the flooring/carpet to see it. The Explorer has a fuel switch access panel in the passenger side rear cargo area. From the Ranger manual:

If your vehicle has a push button start system:
1. Press START/STOP to switch off your vehicle.
2. Press the brake pedal and START/STOP to switch on your vehicle.
3. Remove your foot from the brake pedal and press START/STOP to switch off your vehicle.
4. You can attempt to start the vehicle by pressing the brake pedal and START/STOP, or press START/STOP without pressing the brake pedal.
5. If the vehicle does not start, repeat steps 1 through 4.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: LR48 and ChuckO

Bob Blaylock

Rank III

Supporter I

Feb 20, 2022
121
223
771
59
N 38 29 W 121 26
First Name
Bob
Last Name
Blaylock
Would not pulling the negative terminal not reset the system? Granted, easier said than done on a nasty incline
On the Contour, it was a mechanical sort of switch, that popped open if it experienced a hard enough impact. There was a button on the switch to be pushed, to reset it.

Of course, I'm talking about a car that was built a quarter of a century ago. Ford may or may not be using something similar now.

But assuming that they are, think of a circuit breaker in your house. It's a switch that turns off, if too much current goes through it. There's no remote way to reset it; you have to go where the switch is, and physically turn it back on. The fuel cutoff in my Contour was similar in concept, but it tripped to impact rather than overcurrent.
 

RedThor

Rank 0

Advocate II

Apr 9, 2022
5
10
68
Downey, Los Angeles County, California, United States
First Name
Alex
Last Name
Garcia
Would not pulling the negative terminal not reset the system? Granted, easier said than done on a nasty incline
I put the truck on Neutral and took it down the incline to a safe level spot, I disconnected both terminals of the battery.. nothing! Did a full factory reset, nothing. It just gave out. Took it home, tried it again the next morning, NOTHING. Shit is just dead all stupid. If I was going hard and said ok I broke something, I would be like ok, but not the case. We just need to be aware of going out and be prepared for it giving out. The fuel pump issues are a HUGE problem
 

TBoneBronc

Rank III

Advocate II

Aug 12, 2021
28
36
846
Phoenix, AZ
First Name
Terry
Last Name
Weir
Member #

3368

My 1991 F-350 has a manual switch in the driver's footwell. It is an inertia switch that trips on impact. You can just push a button to reset it. My 2002 Focus SVT had a shutoff switch in the passenger footwell side. Things have no doubt changed, but surely there is a switch in there somewhere.
The 2021 Bronco Owner's Manual shows that an indicator light will show if the fuel pump has been shut off:
1652747366447.png

The manual discusses this system:
1652747634773.png

This is what the manual says to do in order to re-start:
1652747673593.png


It doesn't seem like there is a handy-dandy switch that you and I can pull on our own. The solution looks like getting towed to a shop to get it hooked up to the computer. I'll bet that there is a FORScan code for it somewhere, though.

Good luck getting it fixed!